Little is known about HONORÉ D’AMBRUYS, whose songs appeared in publications between 1660 and 1702. He was a pupil of Michel Lambert, to whom he dedicated his 1685 collection of songs. That book is of particular interest because D’Ambruys composed ornaments of the sort that other composers would leave it to the singers to add, providing a window into the performance practice of the day.

— Howard Posner plays lute and Baroque guitar and practices appellate law in Los Angeles.

JOSEPH CHABANCEAU DE LA BARRE (1633-c. 1678) came from a family of musicians prominent in Paris for about 150 years, and was, like his father before him, organist of the royal chapel. He is represented on this program with a setting of a poem about the paradox that love is increasingly popular despite its ill effects.

— Howard Posner plays lute and Baroque guitar and practices appellate law in Los Angeles.

 

MICHEL LAMBERT (1610-1696) wrote hundreds of such songs. Most of the 20 song collections he is known to have published have been lost, so the 330 surviving Lambert songs may be the tip of a Schubert-size iceberg. Lambert’s musical activities ranged widely – he was known as both a singer and a dancer – but his entire career hewed close to the circle around the royal family. He grew up as a choirboy in the chapel of Louis XIII’s brother the Duke of Orléans, and later counted Cardinal Richelieu, the most powerful man in the French government, among his early patrons.

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