• Radical Light: A Concert for Steven Stucky: Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 8:00pm
  • The recent passing of Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Steven Stucky has profoundly saddened the music world, and this is particularly true in Los Angeles where he had developed many deeply-rooted relationships.

    To honor Stucky’s immeasurable contributions and long-standing collaboration with the orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and several partner organizations have announced a special free concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall. 

    Born: New Orleans, 1960. Donald Harrison grew up in a home environment saturated with the city’s traditional music of brass bands, parades, modern jazz, r&b, funk, classical, world ethnic, and dance music. His connection to New Orleans roots were deepened by his father, a Big Chief in the African and Native American influenced culture of New Orleans’ Black Mardi Gras Indians. The culture is an offshoot culture of Congo Square, one of the only known places in North America where Africans openly participated in their culture in the 1700’s and 1800’s.

    Tenor Saxophonist Javon Jackson came into international prominence touring and recording with the legendary drummer Art Blakey as a member of his band, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Symbolizing a new generation of musicians that blended tradition with neo-jazz, Jackson went on to release 14 recordings as a band leader and tour and record over 135 CDs with jazz greats including Elvin Jones, Freddie Hubbard, Charlie Haden, Betty Carter, Cedar Walton, Ron Carter, Donald Byrd, Dr.

    GRAMMY® Award-nominated recording artist John Beasley leads MONK’estra, a smashing 15-piece big band that captures the spirit of Thelonious Monk’s singular music – the off-beat melodies and humor, strange beauty and unbounded swing in fresh arrangements flavored with New Orleans spirit, hip-hop, Afro-Cuban rhythms and atmospheric colors.

    Some of the most mesmerizing big band music of recent memory.” Don Heckman, IROM

    Born in the city of Denpasar on the island of Bali in Indonesia in June of 2003, Joey Alexander encountered a keyboard at the age of six and immediately began picking out the melody of Thelonious Monk’s “Well, You Needn’t” by ear. His father, an amatuer musician with a huge passion for jazz, was astonished.

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