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Born: 1872, Down Ampney, EnglandDied: 1958, London, England

“Art, and especially the art of music, uses knowledge as a means to the evocation of personal experience in terms which will be intelligible to and command the sympathy of others.”

Ralph Vaughan Williams was central to the revival of British music in the 20th century. Not since Henry Purcell in the 17th century had a native Englishman achieved similar success and renown as a composer. Vaughan Williams studied with Max Bruch and Maurice Ravel before introducing a series of works with a unique feel to them, derived in part from his study of folksong and 16th- and 17th-century English music. He was both popular and admired during his lifetime, and he continues to be so today, with his works occupying a firm place in the repertory.

Further listening:

The Lark Ascending (1914, rev. 1920)Gwen Hoebig, violin; WinnepegSymphony, Bramwell Tovey (CBC)

Mass in G minor (1920-1921)Stuttgart Southwest Radio Vocal EnsembleMarcus Creed (Hänssler Classic)