Come early on select Friday nights, starting at 6:30pm, and enjoy complimentary drinks and a spectacular view of the DTLA skyline from the Garden. Then head over to the  Upbeat Live pre-concert talk  in BP Hall (select nights only).

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Pictures at an Exhibition

Mussorgsky’s masterwork carries us through a spectrum of emotions linked by a stately promenade.

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Muhly’s new Organ Concerto will shake the rafters. Then, Ravel’s unparalleled orchestration of Mussorgsky’s aural pictures will bring down any rafters remaining.

Casual Fridays (including Drinks in THE GARDEN)

*Casual Fridays and Drinks in THE GARDEN: Leave your formal wear behind. Come early beginning at 6:30pm and enjoy complimentary drinks, spectacular views and more – all before your concert. Then, after the concert, join the after-party with orchestra members for complimentary craft beer tastings courtesy of the Los Angeles Brewers Guild.

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A Trip to the Moon

An exhilarating new work for children and families takes its inspiration from Georges Méliès’ adaptation of the Jules Verne classic.

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Inspired by Georges Méliès’ 1902 film A Trip to the Moon, Grawemeyer-winning composer Andrew Norman’s whimsical opera tells the story of a band of bumbling astronomers as they explore the moon, try to fix their broken rocket, and interact with a mysterious race of moon people who are facing a perilous threat of their own. Teddy Abrams also conducts Gustav Holst’s perennially popular suite The Planets, which was based on the characteristics/personalities of the Roman god-named planets of astrology, rather than the solar system orbiters we know from science. The results are colorful, powerful, mysterious, soaring and thoroughly memorable.

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Beethoven & Sibelius

A pair of symbiotic second symphonies from a pair of masters.

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Eminent Swedish maestro Herbert Blomstedt has programmed a pair of beloved second symphonies (in the same key) that differ dramatically from one another, resulting in an unexpected but richly rewarding symbiosis. At its premiere, Beethoven’s Second Symphony was colorfully described by one Viennese critic (who apparently didn’t get its musical jokes) as “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.” Today, it provides the listener with delight upon delight. Sibelius’ Second Symphony, one of the Finnish composer’s most popular works, inhabits another world, a cold land of stark, rugged beauty. Ironically, he began composing it in an Italian villa. Many of its first auditors were convinced that the piece was about Finland’s struggle for independence. In fact, Finnish composer Sulho Ranta said, “There is something about this music – at least for us – that leads us to ecstasy; almost like a shaman with his magic drum.” Ranta may have been speaking only on behalf of his countrymen, but the Symphony has made its mark around the world for its ineffable power to enthrall.

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Mozart & Vaughan Williams

Join us for a night of incomparable piano and masterful symphonic music.

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The incomparable Richard Goode joins us for the exquisite concerto that Mozart composed for a young blind virtuoso named Maria Theresa Paradis. Then, Manze leads a rare performance of Vaughan Williams’ vividly dramatic and expressive Sixth Symphony. Although VW wouldn’t confirm that it was a reaction to the sufferings of WWII, it is clearly in a different world from his more pastoral achievements.

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Mahler’s Song of the Earth

Gustavo Dudamel leads the LA Phil in Mahler at his most transcendent.

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Mahler’s penultimate completed work is virtually unclassifiable – not really a song cycle, symphony, or an operatic drama. His profound settings of seven ancient Chinese poems for alternating solo singers and large orchestra reveal a universe of experience within an individual, our relationship to nature, and the sometimes cruel, sometimes beautiful cycle of life. Composed after the most painful period in Mahler’s life, the songs take us on a journey defined with such titles as “The Drinking Song of Earth’s Sorrow,” “The Solitary One in Autumn,” and “Youth.”

The final movement, combining two poems and sung by the mezzo-soprano, is “The Farewell,” which is nearly as long as all the previous songs combined. It breathes a remarkable air of bittersweet leave-taking, smitten with nature’s beauty as evening approaches, but cognizant of loss and loneliness, eventually arriving at peace and acceptance. The end is delicately quiet, fading imperceptibly into complete silence. We hold our collective breath in awe and contemplation.

In an unprecedented move, the first three of these performances will be staged by our Artist-Collaborator Yuval Sharon in conjunction with TEATROCINEMA, a Chilean theater company renowned for merging live performance with spectacular video effects (Sunday’s performance is music only). This event promises to be a major highlight of the season.

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Dudamel Conducts Beethoven 9

Gustavo Dudamel and the LA Phil in Beethoven’s Ninth – triumph!

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Beethoven’s Ninth has become a touchstone of Western civilization, a musical icon, even a political symbol. But a masterwork’s reputation or place in history is not why we listen. We listen to Beethoven’s Ninth to experience first-hand, in real time, the power, the vision, the humanity Beethoven has crafted into sound. The Ninth ends in such a way as to make us want to stand and shout for joy. But, with a performance by Dudamel, we get even more. Every pitch, every articulation, every dynamic means something to him, and therefore to our personal experience. And all this focus on detail serves his integrated conception of the piece as a whole. We leave irradiated with aesthetic energy, having been present for a living, breathing work of art.

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Schumann Focus: Concert 1

Dudamel and Mitsuko Uchida – one of the world’s foremost Schumann interpreters – reveal the Romantic great.

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Although his life was difficult, to say the least, ending prematurely in madness, Robert Schumann nonetheless composed music that elevates us through its pure spirit and unique personal character. Over three weekends, Gustavo Dudamel delves deeply into Schumann’s four symphonies, two greatest concertos, and a rarely heard oratorio, offering us a portrait of the man through his finest creations.

Joining these programs for Schumann’s only Piano Concerto is the remarkable Mitsuko Uchida, acknowledged as one of the foremost interpreters of Schumann’s keyboard music. The Concerto itself is an absolute masterpiece of mid-19th-century composition and an ideal way to become acquainted with Schumann’s writing.

Astonishingly, the “Spring” Symphony was sketched in only four days. In it, the composer was attempting to capture the anticipation and arrival of springtime, with all its attendant feelings.

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Schumann Focus: Das Paradies

Dudamel pairs with director Peter Sellars for this rarely performed oratorio.

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Although his life was difficult, to say the least, ending prematurely in madness, Robert Schumann nonetheless composed music that elevates us through its pure spirit and unique personal character. Over three weekends, Gustavo Dudamel delves deeply into Schumann’s four symphonies, two greatest concertos, and a rarely heard oratorio, offering us a portrait of the man through his finest creations.

The oratorio Das Paradies und die Peri (Paradise and the Peri) is seen as one of Schumann’s major achievements; even Wagner had positive words for it. The story, which originated with 19th-century Irish poet/singer Thomas Moore, was translated by Schumann and a friend. It tells of a peri – a fairy-like spirit from Persian mythology, somewhere between an angel and a devil – who has been cast out of heaven. Its only way back is by finding the gift that God will like best, which – spoiler alert! – turns out to be a tear from a repentant old sinner who has observed a child praying.

For our production, incomparable operatic mastermind Peter Sellars teams with media artist Refik Anadol to create a never-before-seen staging, bringing the season to a moving conclusion.